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Undergraduate Program

In a multitude of fields, today’s professionals need not only quantitative reasoning, creativity and problem-solving skills, but also the ability to communicate effectively with coworkers, clients, and the general public about technical topics. To develop students’ reasoning and problem-solving skills, instruction in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics is guided by a set of learning objectives, that inform every course as well as the entire curriculum. To develop students’ communication skills combined with increasing the effectiveness of our learning goals, the Department’s curriculum is guided by an integrated technical writing plan.  As a result, Georgetown math majors and minors graduate with the skills necessary to succeed in quantitative-intensive professions, such as academic or industrial mathematics and statistics, as well as professions which require logical thinking and the ability to communicate, such as law, medicine, engineering and economics.

We offer courses for non Majors, Undergraduate Majors leading to either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, an Undergraduate Minor, and a Major with Honors. Students with advanced placement credits should review the information for proper placement.

Major in mathematics

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers two majors. The A.B. major is designed for students planning graduate study or employment outside mathematics (medicine, law, business, finance, journalism, government service, or precollege teaching). The B.S. major is designed for students planning graduate study or employment in mathematics. Any student contemplating a math major or minor, and whose faculty advisor is not in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, is strongly urged to consult with the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

It is recommended that students considering majoring in mathematics take Introduction to Proof and Problem Solving (200) following Calculus II and no later than Fall of their Sophomore year. This course gives students a good understanding of what is involved in higher mathematics and will help them decide if they want to be a math major.

A .B. Mathematics Major

The AB degree requires a total of 10 courses.

  • Calculus II (036) (Prerequisite: Calculus I (035), four credits of Calculus AP credit, or passing a departmental exam.)
  • Multivariable Calculus (137)
  • Linear Algebra (150)
  • Introduction to Proof and Problem Solving (200) (Prerequisite: B or better in 036 or department approval.)
  • Abstract Algebra (215) (Prerequisite: Math 200 or permission of instructor)
  • Analysis I (310) (Prerequisite: Math 215 or permission of instructor)
  • 4 Mathematics electives at level of 140 or higher

The four core courses, Calculus II (036), Multivariable Calculus (137), Linear Algebra (150), and Introduction to Proof and Problem Solving (200), introduce basic mathematical concepts as well as develop students’ mathematical reasoning and communication skills. Students will further develop abstract reasoning skills in the required upper level courses Abstract Algebra (215) and Analysis I (310).

Because of the Calculus I prerequisite, students who cannot complete 036, 137, 150, and 200 by the end of their sophomore year should postpone 150 to their junior year. Abstract Algebra is normally taken in the junior year, Analysis I in Fall of senior year.  An upper level course may be substituted for Calculus II, Multivariable Calculus, and Linear Algebra for students passing an appropriate departmental placement test.

 B. S. Mathematics Major

The BS degree is normally for students interested in graduate studies in a quantitative subject, and as such, students with this major are expected to keep at least a B average in their mathematics courses. This degree requires a total of 13 courses.

  • Calculus II (036) (Prerequisite: Calculus I (035), four credits of Calculus AP credit, or passing a departmental exam.)
  • Multivariable Calculus (137)
  • Mathematical Statistics (140)
  • Linear Algebra (150)
  • Introduction to Proof and Problem Solving (200) (Prerequisite: B or better in 036 or department approval.)
  • Abstract Algebra (215) (Prerequisite: Math 200 or permission of instructor)
  • Analysis I (310) (Prerequisite: Math 215 or permission of instructor)
  • Complex Variables (316)
  • 4 Mathematics electives at level of 200 or higher
  • Computer Science I (COSC-051) or equivalent

The four core courses, Calculus II (036), Multivariable Calculus (137), Linear Algebra (150), and Introduction to Proof and Problem Solving (200), introduce basic mathematical concepts as well as develop students’ mathematical reasoning and communication skills. Students will further develop abstract reasoning skills in the required upper level courses Abstract Algebra (215), Analysis I (310), and Complex Variables (316). In addition, students will gain a basic statistical understanding in Mathematical Statistics (140).

Because of the Calculus I prerequisite, students who cannot complete 036, 137, 150, and 200 by the end of their sophomore year should postpone 150 to their junior year. Abstract Algebra is normally taken in the junior year, Analysis I in Fall of senior year and Complex Variables (316) in Spring of senior year.  An upper level course may be substituted for Calculus II, Multivariable Calculus, and Linear Algebra for students passing an appropriate departmental placement test.

 To encourage the serious math major to see some significant applications of mathematics, one of the four electives for the BS degree can be a mathematically intensive course in another discipline (approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies), such as Physical Chemistry Lectures (CHEM-219/220), Efficient Computing Methods (COSC-504), Game Theory (ECON-459), Relativity and Quantum Physics (PHYS-211), Mathematical Logic (PHIL-482).

Minor in Mathematics

The minor requires a minimum of six courses, with five of the courses at the 100 level or above. Required courses are

  • Calculus II (036)
  • Multivariable Calculus (137)
  • Linear Algebra (150)
  • 3 Mathematics electives at level of 140 or higher

Calculus I (035) (or its equivalent in the form of AP credit or passing a departmental exam) is a pre-requisite for Calculus II. An upper level course may be substituted for Calculus II, Multivariable Calculus, and Linear Algebra for students passing an appropriate departmental placement test. The math minor must take a minimum of two 200+  level courses within the department, regardless of transfer credit or study abroad credit.

mathematics Honors

A junior majoring in mathematics may apply to perform a research project in the senior year with a mathematics faculty mentor leading to a substantial paper and an oral presentation. A committee of three mathematics faculty members must approve the initial application, and whether to approve the final paper prior to the oral presentation. Normally an applicant should have a B+ average in mathematics courses to participate and will take an independent study tutorial (MATH-301) during the Fall of senior year.

advanced placement

Prospective students are encouraged to take an Advanced Placement Examination in Mathematics. A student who scores either four or five on the Calculus BC examination is awarded eight semester hours credit, may omit Calculus I (035) and Calculus II (036), and can take Multivariable Calculus (137). A student who scores four or five on the Calculus AB examination is awarded four semester hours credit, may omit Calculus I (035), and can take Calculus II (036). Students who have not received credit or advanced placement by means of these examinations, but who believe that their preparation in high school is substantially equivalent to Calculus I may take a placement examination, administered by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics during the registration period at the beginning of the Fall term. Passing this exam allows the student to take Calculus II. Students can petition the Department to take a placement exam for Calculus II, Multivariable Calculus, and Linear Algebra. Passing the exam allows the math major or minor to replace the course with an upper level mathematics course.  Further information may be obtained from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics or from the office of the Dean of the College. See the sections on Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate in this Bulletin for information about advanced placement in statistics.

 

For course listings in Mathematics, see our Courses page

 

Department of Mathematics and Statistics327A St. Mary's Hall37th and O Streets, N.W., Washington D.C. 20057Phone: (202) 687.6214Fax: (202) 687.6067

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